For better sleep, half of US adults say they would give up the internet

Six in 10 Americans say their sleep routines feel different during the winter than in other seasons.

That’s according to a survey of 2,000 U.S. adults, commissioned by Mattress Firm and conducted by OnePoll between Sept. 26 and Sept. 29, as reported by SWNS.

Respondents are also more willing to make sacrifices for better sleep. Nearly half of Americans would give up the internet for a year if only they could get better slumber at night.

SLEEP DEPRIVATION COULD RELIEVE DEPRESSION BUT ONLY TEMPORARILY, SAYS STUDY, AS DOCTORS SHARE WARNINGS

Another 43% would trade their phone, 41% would give up their car and 37% would pass up a job promotion.

How winter impacts sleep

The recent end of daylight saving time could have something to do with people’s willingness to make sacrifices for extra sleep — 48% of survey respondents said they feel tired earlier, while 41% move up their bedtimes when it gets dark earlier.

Woman on phone at night

Half of Americans would trade a year of internet access in exchange for better sleep, according to a recent survey of 2,000 U.S. adults. (iStock)

Nearly four in five of the participants (78%) said they can discern when their circadian rhythm is thrown off.

A quarter of people said it is most difficult to wake up during the winter compared to any other time of year.

KIDS’ SLEEP PROBLEMS COULD BE INHERITED, NEW RESEARCH SUGGESTS

Additionally, winter tends to make people feel especially tired (21% of respondents) or sad (20%), the survey found.

“It’s truly remarkable how keenly attuned we are to the impact of circadian rhythm disruptions, particularly when they stem from the change in seasons and length of daylight,” said Dr. Jade Wu, sleep advisor at Mattress Firm in North Carolina, as reported by SWNS. 

Woman sad in bed

Among the survey respondents, 40% said they have been diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), while a total of 53% believe they have it. (iStock)

“Our bodies’ acute awareness of these changes serves as a reminder of the intricate connection between our internal clocks and the external environment.”

Among the survey respondents, 40% said they have been diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), while a total of 53% believe they have it.

LACK OF SLEEP IS COMPROMISING THE MENTAL HEALTH OF 78% OF ADULTS, SURVEY FINDS

Among the most commonly cited “winter feelings” were apathy (32%), general discontent (32%), loneliness (29%), mood swings (28%), loss of interest (26%), anxiety (22%), sadness (16%), excess sleepiness (15%) and fatigue (10%).

Man awake at night

Winter tends to make people feel especially tired (21% of respondents) or sad (20% of respondents), the new survey found. (iStock)

Those despondent feelings appear to negatively impact sleep, with 49% of people burrowing under blankets, 48% not sleeping as long as they should and another 48% finding themselves tossing and turning.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER

“Winter often comes with a gloomy feeling because it’s a prolonged lull in daytime activity levels, which can also make your nights less restful,” continued Wu, per SWNS. 

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“One of the best things you can do for your body is to get active during the day and give it a relaxing environment for sleep.”

OnePoll conducts quantitative research and runs online surveys, its website details. 

For more Health articles, visit www.foxnews.com/health.

Check Also

COVID “likely growing” in D.C. and 12 states, CDC estimates

COVID-19 infections are now likely growing in at least 12 states and the District of …